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Caralluma Fimbriata for appetite suppress

Caralluma fimbriata is a succulent plant, in the cactus family. It has been used as a natural appetite suppressant in India for centuries.
This plant from family of cactii and succulent plants became most popular for their appetite suppressant, and weight loss properties, as well as their ability to lower blood sugar.
It has been eaten in rural India for centuries, raw, as a vegetable with spices, or preserved in chutneys and pickles, and is often found as a roadside shrub or boundary marker.
It has been used as a portable food and thirst quencher for hunting. It is also used for its purported ability to suppress hunger and appetite and enhance stamina.Some studies reported that Caralluma fimbriata has an effect on the appetite control centre of the brain.

Tribesmen on a day’s hunt will often only pack some Caralluma fimbriata to sustain themselves and hence it is commonly known as ”famine food” in India. In a small clinical trial conducted in India, modest benefits of Caralluma fimbriata extract. In the clinical study, 50 overweight individuals were given either a placebo or one gram of extract each day for 60 days.

Compared to the placebo group, individuals receiving the extract showed no significant change in body weight, body mass index, hip circumference, body fat or energy intake; however, both appetite and waist circumference were reduced.

The key phytochemical constituents of the herb are pregnane glycosides, flavone glycosides, megastigmane glycosides, and saponins.

Caralluma fimbriata is believed to block the activity of several enzymes, which then blocks the formation of fat, forcing fat reserves to be burned. Caralluma fimbriata is also believed to have an effect on the appetite control mechanism of the brain.

Ayurvedic (traditional Indian medicine) experts have noted that there are no adverse effects when using Caralluma fimbriata, and the plant has no known toxicity.
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